"Fascism and communism both promise "social welfare," "social justice," and "fairness" to justify authoritarian means and extensive arbitrary and discretionary governmental powers." - F. A. Hayek"

"Life is a Bungling process and in no way educational." in James M. Cain

Jean Giraudoux who first said, “Only the mediocre are always at their best.”

If you have ten thousand regulations, you destroy all respect for the law. Sir Winston Churchill

"summum ius summa iniuria" ("More laws, more injustice.") Cicero

As Christopher Hitchens once put it, “The essence of tyranny is not iron law; it is capricious law.”

"Government’s view of the economy could be summed up in a few short phrases: If it moves, tax it. If it keeps moving, regulate it. And if it stops moving, subsidize it." Ronald Reagan

"Law is where you buy it." Raymond Chandler

"Why did God make so many damn fools and Democrats?" Clarence Day

"If I feel like feeding squirrels to the nuts, this is the place for it." - Cluny Brown

"Oh, pshaw! When yu' can't have what you choose, yu' just choose what you have." Owen Wister "The Virginian"

Oscar Wilde said about the death scene in Little Nell, you would have to have a heart of stone not to laugh.

Thomas More's definition of government as "a conspiracy of rich men procuring their own commodities under the name and title of a commonwealth.” ~ Winston S. Churchill, A History of the English Speaking Peoples

“Laws are like cobwebs, which may catch small flies, but let wasps and hornets break through.” ~ Jonathon Swift

Sunday, April 16, 2017

America was Lucky to Have Irving Berlin - "God Bless America" and "Easter Parade"

Easter Parade
Steyn's Song for The Season

by Irving Berlin On the Town  
Happy Easter and Happy Passover to our readers around the world. We moved our Saturday movie night to Good Friday for Mel Gibson's blockbuster The Passion Of The Christ. So, for the weekend proper, here's a special podcast, audiophonically adapted from an essay that appears in Steyn's book A Song For The Season.
This year marks the centenary of the most famous pop hit about Easter - sort of. Irving Berlin's "Easter Parade" has its origins in a very obscure chin-up song from the Great War written in 1917. In this audio special, Mark traces its origins as a First World War morale booster to its re-emergence a generation later as the American Songbook's only Easter standard. Along the way, we'll also explore the long languished tradition of Easter parades, the meaning of the word "rotogravure", and whether anyone actually could write a sonnet about your Easter bonnet. To accompany Mark on the trail of this American anthem, there are musical performers from Al Jolson and John McCormack to Frank Sinatra and Rosemary Clooney - plus Irving Berlin himself and a young George Gershwin. And we'll also touch on a few other numbers that played a role in this song's story, from "God Bless America" and "Pack Up Your Troubles In Your Old Kit Bag" to "Hooray For Hollywood" and the haunting "Supper Time".

-go to link-

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